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to the center for american progress. higher education is the topic. they are talking about higher education and american competitiveness. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we are live at the center for american progress with gene sperling and drew faust. there are looking at out education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. this is getting started a little later appeared things in d.c. are little slower because of the fog. while we wait, some of the programming coming up are under way. we're airing to live discussions on voting in the 2012 election. panelists are looking at whether it will affect immigration policy. immigration works is hosting that discussion. it got under way at 9:00 eastern. another hour to go. a daylong conference on the voter experience in 2012 with representatives from google, microsoft, and twitter. other topics include a voter i.d. laws and some of the long lines in georgia by voters. it will go on all day on c-span 3. the center for american progress is hosting this discussio
such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
education and retirement. >> on the tax side, as part of the adults of a solution, to you think the gap between the way work is tax and investment and capital gains are taxed -- does that have to narrow as part of the final solution? >> i think so. capital gains going up 20%, some people suggest even more. that is something we should look at. there is concern about that. the differential is one of the reasons why will the americans pay so little. ann romney be one of them. it is not really fair. he thought it was -- mitt romney being one of the imperious -- to being one of them. >> on the other side of the leisure, they never released a math and with a scribbled all of the house -- on the other side of the ledger him, they never released a nafta and where they scribbled on of the ideas. we have had an election. shut those two ideas still be on the table the that the president -- should those two idea still be on the table when the president and the speaker are in the room together? >> it doesn't have to be done right now. it is not as much risk. we should deal with it and we should. whe
of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
our system and say that is the foundation for higher education for those who will be innovators in the future. the harvard business school last your did a competitiveness survey. they found higher education institutions or america's greatest asset. they found one of the highest concerns of the many leaders in business that they serve it was the state of k-12 education which was seen as a huge disadvantage in american competitiveness. students who are coming to college, 43% are not ready for college in one field or another. universities need to do considerable remedial work before they can even start the students on the treasury to what a college education should be. how do we begin to address the challenges that this has had a number of exciting innovations? they are trying to in able research, uniting that with business school faculty that shows how you lead an organization like a school district or school. and what they can add to train educational leaders who can transform systems. this has been a popular degree. it has wonderful candidates who go through its. this is just on
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
and sergei together based on their education at a higher level to create google in private industry, if you want to declare the garage as private industry. to me sitting here google is sort of the epitome of the way all those forces come together to create what i think of innovation now, and that is what larry page said when you first apply to google, one of the things you have to learn rightway is his line is, he wants you to have all the people at googling a healthy disregard for the impossible. and that is something particularly after coming out of government, i really took me a while to shift my brain to work that way. let me answer the question in two ways in terms of innovation and i do want to bring it back to what president faust was talking about. what concerns me so greatly when i am allowed to stand on the precipice of a company that is constantly creating and innovating because of this healthy disregard they have for the impossible, like google, when i'm working with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists who also invest in that notion of no guarantees, but a sterling ride, in wo
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
for right now, and give our kids the kind of education they need to succeed in the 21st century. i want to make sure america leads the world in research and technology and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges and our schools. [applause] that's how we grow an economy. i want us to bring down our deficits, but i want to do it in a balanced, responsible way. and i want to reward -- i want a tax code that rewards businesses and manufacturers like detroit diesel right here, creating jobs right here in redford, right here in michigan, right here in the united states of america. [applause] that's where we need to go. that's the country we need to build. and when it comes to bringing manufacturing back to america -- that's why i'm here today. since 1938, detroit diesel has been turning out some of the best engines in the world. [applause] over all those years, generations of redford workers have walked through these doors. not just to punch a clock. not just to pick up a paycheck. not just to build an engine. but to build a middle-class life for t
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
university is a world class institution. ahead, how this education jim helps its neighbors. -- education gem plans to help its neighbors. >> and nothing to do with rain gear. >> coming up, cashing in on an ugly holiday tradition. the teenager who attacked the idea is earning him a little extra cash this season. >> rain is -- the teenager whose tacky idea is earning him whose tacky idea is earning him a little extra cash this whose tacky idea is earning him a little extra cash this wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> maryland students are not only reading more, but anders standing more of the words they read. -- but understanding more of the words they read. vocabulary results for maryland fourth and eighth graders are of three points, above the national average. educators say they
for us. if you will do something on stem education, qualified members help us identify companies from understanding of their home markets. we work with local chambers, members of congress, and we have developed a network of convenience, local business leaders better interested in participating and know how to recruit people. so far we are brought more than two thousand people to the white house this year alone representing more than 500 towns and cities, probably around 1800 companies. out of 10 our ceo's. two out of 10 are investors. host: scott. georgia. republican. caller: i may health insurance broker and i have a couple of the employees and a comment on the aca. i agree and something had to be done on health care costs, but this will just add fuel to the fire. part of the provisions that have yet to come into effect, one of which requires the highest ratio from three-to-one, that is your lowest rate cannot be any higher than three times your lowest rate. so, if you have a 64-year-old and a 19-year-old, you can not charge the real cost because the risk factors for a 19-year-old ar
of the pie, transportation infrastructure. 2% makes up education. 2% for science and medical research and 1% for nonsecurity international. 4% all other. that is break down of the federal budget. >> we will hear from white house spokesman jay carney coming up in half an hour. the briefing at 1:00 eastern live here on c-span2. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >>
of the resources to solve the problem. i think we need an education program by learned scholars, such as those in this audience to help us in getting this word out to america. i think it is essential because it is coming on very fast. there are things that are happening that we take for granted. as an example, we take for granted the fact that we can move thousands and thousands of marines, sailors, soldiers and have the equipment without any burden to carry economy, not true. the truth of the matter is is a tremendous burden to our economy to have a national-security policy that defends the country that we love so much. without having the ability and willingness to get out and give the american public forums such as this in helping giving us answers to some of the very difficult questions that they ask, i want to take this opportunity to think robby for what he does. i met him some years ago when he found my office in an office building. he came in and we had a chat and i said, my goodness, this fellow knows what he is talking about and he has never disappointed me whatsoever. what we need to
to do effective voter education and so until we address that, that systemic issue, they can you're going to continue to see things over and over again. you know, if you want to -- something that is a little bit kind of absurd situation, in galveston, texas, there were 39 polling places that opened in the afternoon because they didn't give enough time to turn the machines on and let them warm up and the judge had to extend polling place hours. so simple things that impact voters in an area. that was something that was surprising to us. or the high number of provisional ballots where they didn't have the right registration information. then you had, especially in predominantly african-american precincts, voters who were showg up and they were given provisional ballots. and there were so many provisional ballots, there were some voter had to walk away. and that shouldn't happen in this country. >> a great example. >> we had a great voter protection team headed by bill bauer and court in the, and we had a good system to track. so just break down what we saw on election day. 32% of the issues
is given the economy of prince george's county, the education level and the demographics of prince george's county, here's the question. is this the best that prince george's county has to offer when it comes to public service? >> i can't believe that it is. on one hand, i just think that people need to step up. and get involved. so that you don't have to make a choice between two individuals like this. >> well, the governor will and can now choose someone else. and mr. hall has indicated he may appeal the decision. >> and that's his right to appeal. >> he also has a right to run. >> he has a right to run for office, should he choose to. >> the brother of former d.c. chair kwame brown, charged with bank fraud. charged with claiming for more income than he earned for a loan modification. that's the same charge that led to kwame brown's resignation as chair after his efforts to buy a boat. this is pretty ironic. >> ironic and unfortunate. >> here again we're talking about public image. although his brother wasn't in public life, but it was related to the brother who was the chair of the d.c
, education, voter suppression, what the leadership has done is, say on immigration, we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a tough party on a number of issues you've mentioned before? >> there's no question about that. >> when do you think the republican parties broke bad? when did it start to be a part that you couldn't be a member of anymore? >> i think it started several years ago. maybe two, three years ago. i mean, i left the party two years ago and became an ind pen dependent. i did so, because of the fact that on all of those issues, it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. but, you know, for me, as a live and let live kind of guy, as somebody who wants to be toll rant, who wants to be kind, the leadership doesn't seem to embrace that kind of view. so it became uncomfortable to me. the values that my mother and father raised me and m
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
phones and tablets including everything from instructive or educational materials to games. children of all ages, armed with these devices, are using apps and raising concerns over privacy. federal trade commission is now investigating whether companies that make apps are violating the privacy rights of children by collecting personal data from mobile devices and sharing it with advertisers and data banks. these types of apps can detail a child's physical location or phone numbers of their friends along with other information. yesterday the f.t.c. issued a new report documenting those concerns. it found among 400apps designed for kids most failed to inform parents about the types of data that could be gathered and who would access it. the co-editor of the collaborative web blog boing boing and a father who uses and closely watches apps for kids. we talked via laptop. >> your phone as a unique i.d., and so that i.d. could be passed to third party ad networks that are advertising on other apps so they can follow you from app to app and build a file on the kinds of things that you're do
to the defense settlement and the objective the nhs budget and the object to the education budget, even though nhs schools are going up, and what exactly would they do? the problem is as was evident from the shadow chancellor's response, they didn't have anything to say on these matters but if they had a credible deficit plan then we would listen to the questions they ask us about the priorities of those plans. >> john stephenson. >> this cools and colleges of 270 million are extremely welcome. schools and colleges such as those in my constituency plans on the runway ready to take off, just in a little additional financial support. will the chancellor help those colleges and schools? >> i'm very happy to look personally at the case my honorable friend makes for his local education facility. these are of course other government departments but we have provided the money for education, for new free schools and academies. and i'm sure that carlyle should be looked at. >> steve reed. >> chancellor aware because of his continuing inadequate level of funding to school building which today's statemen
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
on financial aid. and it would be a tragedy if this country moves in a direction to make education less affordable. so we, as a university, are very dependent and very concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> are you also in the class from parent university? >> i do enjoy teaching. and i take every opportunity to meet with students, to talk to students, and to teach in my spare time. >> what does a provost do and how long were you at princeton? >> i was at princeton for 28 years from the time i got my ph.d. until the time i came to pan and i was on the faculty at princeton and also provost, the chief academic and chief financial officer at princeton, so the proposed works very closely with the president. >> what is the learning curve on being president of the university? >> well, the learning curve is steep for anybody, and it is also very exciting. >> how many students, give us -- >> the university of pennsylvania has 10,000 undergraduates approximately into a dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we run three hospitals. we have a great school of med
know this better than i do, whether it's immigration, education, voter suppression, what the leadership of the party has done is say on immigration, you know, you got -- we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote in a civil manner -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a party on a number of the issues you mentioned before? before recently. when is the big -- when do you think the republican party in your terms broke bad? when did it start to be a party you couldn't be comfortably a member of anymore as governor or as a political person at all? >> i think it started several years ago, maybe three, two, three years ago. i left the party two years ago and became an independent. and i did so because of the fact that, you know, on all of those issues it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. i mean, you know, everybody has the right to be a member of whatever party they want and i
and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, it wasn't just that we would crowd out private capital. it was that we would crowd out public investment in the future, in children come in modern infrastructure, and innovation. when we decide we agree to cut spending, which we need to as but in larger deficit reduction. those of you who care about innovation need to care about how you cut, how did this spending. -- how you do spending. we have cut domestic d
are education and training. and then sometimes they're talking about skill gaps where there's just not a strong enough connection between how we do worker training and the skills that are actually opened in particular areas. and all three of those are important skill gap were still issues, but they did not take with them the exact same policy solutions. and as we move forward, places like cap and others can help all of us by helping to define these issues and defined which policies address them. and i would suggest would be strongest when we have a larger skills compact. i think, many people come to silicon valley to silicon valley of talk is about the need for high skills immigration. and i agree. i think we do need to do more on -- the president agrees, but not just of a larger copperheads of immigration strategy, but one component of a larger skills strategy which also talks about how we can increase the number of skilled workers coming from our country, from u.s. schools, from u.s. work force. together, that is a skills compact i think the country could easily get behind and support. so i t
and pretend -- not these guys but someone else from the radio station. they're from the board of education and said there was a mistake and she did badly. they had one girl on and put her on a lie detector 14 years old and asked about her sex life. she gets raem upset and turns out she was raped at 12. this sort of thing, object seven at this times and they had a porn star on one sometime. another one is carl sanderson, controversial on the radio station. a female journalist wrote a negative story about her, and et cetera esd he was going to get her. >> what happens to the radio station and these two deejays? is there an investigation? >> scotland yard in britain is investigating, and they've spoken to australian police to pull together their investigation. we expect the coroner's court decision to come out or the coroner to make a statement today, actually. the company -- we have a comment from the company. they say first and foremost we'd like to express our deep and sincere con dolenesss to the family for the lost and we're sorry for what happened. we don't claim to be perfect and we al
poverty. highlighting things like education are a path laid to burning the right to be heard. because a lot of communities are saying we just don't believe that you care about us. i think that having folks who communicate well is a ticket to making that hard battle happen. greg: i read his books and offense. your latest one, you revert to the republican party as hard wing conservatives. that they are being pushed into political relevance. >> yes, for example, the fight over the fiscal cliff is taking place between speaker boehner and the white house. they put republicans in the senate in a rare type of position where they are in the game, but they are not the leaders of the game. see what is going on in the senate in general. we're republicans should have the majority of the senate, if not highly ontological candidates were nominated by the party base. thinking of someone like richard murdoch in indiana. there's no reason the democrats should not hold that seat. they are putting republicans in the senate at a disadvantage. >> the other thing is that ted cruz is a tea party candidate,
for religious sisters but it now educates a diverse group of students from around the world offering high quality educational opportunities that continue to reflect its catholic heritage. soon after its founding, laroche experienced financial difficulties that threatened the school's existence. due to the financial strain, the congregation at that time seriously considered permanently closing the college, however, because of the profound and positive impact this school has made on the community in such a short time, its donors at that time, the students, the state official, the community leaders urged the congregation and the school's leadership to continue the mission of the school and keep the school opened. thankfully due to the outpouring of support from the community, in 1970 the board amended its charter to establish laroche college as an independent co-educational catholic institution which it remains today. it also joined with the art institute of pittsburgh and diversified its course official, expanding the areas of study the college would offer, including graphic and interior de
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "hardball." now time for the "sideshow." first, 38 republicans voted this week to defeat a u.n. treaty that promotes rights for disabled citizens worldwide 37 last night jon stewart took them on. >> i guess it's time for a new segment "please tell me this is rock bottom." it's official, republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. you voted no because your fear is if we sign onto a treaty that is only recommendations for improved disability standards, standards we ourselves made the law of the land in this country 20 years ago, what's to stop the men if blue helmets from storming into your living room, i'm sorry, school, and force you to build a wheelchair accessible ramp to the cafeteria. i'm sorry, your kitchen. >> and from the tea party right to the liberal left. we had massachusetts congressman barney frank on "hardball" this week for an i
you save some money. my job is not just to entertain you but i'm trying to educate and teach you. call me. 1-800-743-cnbc. you want to get a sense of just how important this -- i hate to even say it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is mo
. much like we want to have universal access to education. and we got to work hard every day to make certain of two things. one, it's good quality. and, two, it's affordable. and in fact i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we're talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, diabetes, they have better outcomes than we do. so i think whatever it is you're delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always be self-critical to try to examine, are we doing it the right way, can we do it better, how can we make it work. but in the second thing, even if we say we don't want universal health care, somebody gets sick, most of the team they'll end up in a hospital and they'll get care. and the cost of that care is simply shifted onto everybody else who is paying insurance. like for instance if you have health care at work, about $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated car
for maryland students. vocabulary results are above the national average. maryland educators say they are not surprised. more on-line classes continue to arrive in baltimore county. dallas dance told students at the district could get between $30 million and $40 million to start up the project. school systems would help to close the achievement gap with the money. >> we would be able to put every single course the kids would need to graduate online. >> 61 school systems are in the running for the federal dollars including baltimore city. >> 5:36. things really do get better with age, according to a study, including your well-being. you should turn that frown upside down. >> the real reason we enjoy our goal to pleasures so much. >> don't forget to e-mail us your response to our water cooler question of the day. are you spending more or less this holiday shopping season? you can share your response at wbaltv.com and on our facebook page, or send us an e-mail to watercooler@wbaltv.com. >> how of the area roads shaping >> how of the area roads shaping up maddy, come on. we got a new
and build an education center there. 46 people flying on september 11th from newark, newark, to san francisco were killed when flight 93 crashed in that field. the families say they're hoping for a boost from private donors including fortune 500 companies. >> i feel nothing but peace when i'm at the site, when i'm stand oughted sacred ground. >> 450,000 people have already visited the memorial. >>> has our obsession with cell phones risen to the level of an addiction? some researchers say yes. they say factors such as materialism and impulsiveness play a big role in tipping cell phone use into an addiction especially when phones are used excessively in public. that's when we're signaling that we have a shiny object, status symbol. young adults check their phones an average of 60 times a day. >>> new details about the kansas city chiefs player who killed his girlfriend and then committed suicide. among other things, police are now saying that he may have had another girlfriend. jovan belcher shot the mother of his daughter at their home early in the morning and today we learned that
no leadership capable of making a deal. you cannot start with the education of little kids, teaching them to hate israel and everything that it stands for, and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. there are a lot of conditions for this to work. it cannot happen overnight. as i said, part of the problem is that have created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of a reasonable deal. >> express some realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. we'll be back essentially to where it was before 9/11. what happens to pakistan after that? it is semi-democratic. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as to apply them, there will be certain -- circumstances were some send potential compromise is required, the new approach of these problems that way. if you have very good intelligence, you understand better what is going on within t
, they declare victory and move on. we can argue debate that -- >> you're both educating me tonight. it's about taxes. the president can win this one before christmas. thank you, chuck todd and chris cillizza. >>> up next, the story no one is talking about at notre dame. some people are charging cover-up. this is going to be a hot one and not very pleasant for me. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> they're still counting votes from the election, and every day president obama's lead grows. according to david wasserman who is tracking the vote count, president obama has 50.96% of the vote compared to romney's 47.31%. the president's lead of roughly 36% point makes the election close but not that close. five other elections since world war ii have been closer, including president bush's own win over kerry in 2004. we'll be right back. >>> well, welcome back to "hardball." this 2010 headline was a look at notre dame university in the way the university handled its student complaint. it reads, notre dame silent on teen's death. she was sexually attacked by a football player. she was a f
paying deficit while still investing in education and research that are important to growing our economy and if we are serious about protecting middle class families then we are going to have to ask the wettiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >> higher tax rate, of course, at issue and whether or not as republicans had hoped they could just close loopholes and tax deductions and that could. >> he keep say the wealthiest americans but $250,000 that's not the wealthest of america. >> right. so there was some word during the campaign when joe biden let slip that $1 million would be the threshold for which they would begin to tax the wealthest americans. marco rubio on a saturday morning addressed as well. they are going after each other. senator marco rubio and president obama in these dueling addresses. >> we must get the national debt under control. taxes will not solve our 16 trillion-dollar debt. only economic growth and form of entitlement programs will control the debt. woe must reform the job killing tax code by getting rid of unjustif
education. we've got to have profit sharing. we have to have productivity sharing. we've got to have arrangements that while not counteracting globalization, nevertheless counteract the effects of globalization and make sure the middle class is safe. without that union voice, the new class has become less and less secure. >> eliot: of course, as we all have learned over the past number of years, one of the critical elements of politics is the phrasing you use to describe an issue or problem saying these are right-to-work laws is a misnomer. first point you made, this has nothing to do with the right to work. who can be off owessed to the right to work. this is about creating a freeloader problem that you described. explain once again what this really goes to the heart of. >> the heart of the matter is, to have a union, you have got to have benefits that go to everybody who is working at a particular plant in a particular company. the only way that a union can afford to maintain its bargaining position and its
first priority, education, and improving the prince george's county school system. he says he knows for sure that he's running for a second term. in prince george's county, tracee wilkins, news4. >>> the brother of former d.c. council chairman kwame brown has been charged with bank fraud, the same charge that led kwame brown to resign his council seat earlier this year. according to the charging documents, che brown made false claims about his income on a mortgage loan application back in 2010. his lawyer says brown plans to plead guilty. che brown also pleaded guilty to a similar charge back in 1995. >>> one of the world's biggest banks announced today it will cut jobs and close some branches. citigroup plans to lay off about 11,000 workers worldwide. most of those cuts will be in consumer banking. about 80 branches around the world are closing. more than half of them in the united states. and that includes a citibank in manassas and glen burne. citigroup's stock went up after this announcement. executives say the cuts will help them save about $1 billion a year. >>> warm around he
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